Medical Qigong Therapy: Qi Emission Therapy

for the treatment of Uterine Cysts and Tumors




The Uterus: Bao

Utero

Figure 1. The Chinese Ideograph for Uterus (Bao)

Several classical dictionaries translate “Bao” as the uterus, but the word Bao in Chinese Medicine refers to both the physical and energetic structure within which the embryo develops.

The ideograph depicting the Chinese characters for the uterus “Bao” is described as follows (Figure 1):

• The Chinese character “Bao” is composed of two images. To the left, “Ji” depicts the Chinese ideogram for body tissue, muscle or flesh (all of which are forms of connective tissue). The character on the right means to wrap, and refers to a bag or sack. Together these characters depict the uterus and represent an embryo wrapped, protected, and contained inside the mother’s abdomen. In ancient China, the character for Bao was occasionally used to refer to the Urinary Bladder, placenta, or uterus.

 

Function of the Uterus

The 2 functions of the uterus

Figure 2. The Two Functions of the Uterus

The uterus is shaped like an inverted pear and is anatomically located in the lower abdomen of the female, behind the Urinary Bladder and in front of the rectum. It is a female reproductive organ, with its lower opening connected to the vagina via the cervix.

In ancient Chinese Medicine, the term uterus encompasses the woman’s entire internal genital system including the fallopian tubes and ovaries. Its main physiological functions, that of regulating menstruation, conception, and pregnancy, are described as follows (Figure 2):

  1. Regulating Menstruation: The uterus is the organ by which a woman forms her menses. In ancient China, is was believed that a girl’s Kidney Qi nourishes the uterus, increasing the size of her womb into full maturation by the time she reaches the age of 14. Under the influence of “Tian Gui” (the 10th Heavenly Stem), her Conception Vessel flourishes to become more unobstructed, her Thrusting Vessel flourishes, her Sea of Blood becomes fuller, and she begins her menses. It was also believed that at the time when the Kidney Jing became rich in essence, the energetic influence of “Tian Gui” (the 10th Heavenly Stem) would promote the discharge of the ovum and Blood. Tian Gui is the “Yin Water” Heavenly Stem of “Earlier Heaven,” and represents the energetic regathering of new life-force associated with Kidney Yin. Tian Gui energetically moves “underground” and is considered to be the Yin Water of the congenital constitution. Being invisibly cultivated, it awaits a new breakthrough. In old age, as the Qi of the Kidneys begins to weaken, the Tian Gui begins to dry, causing menopause in women.
    The three Yin organs of the Heart, Liver, and Spleen also energetically connect to the uterus through their relationships with the Blood. The Heart governs the Blood. The Liver stores the Blood and regulates the volume of circulating Blood, which is responsible for normal menstruation. The Spleen controls the Blood.
    Generally, when a woman reaches the approximate age of 49, her Kidney Qi has weakened because the “Tian Gui” in her body has become exhausted. At this point, both her Conception and Thrusting Vessels close and become obstructed creating menstrual irregularities until menopause occurs.
  2. Conception and Pregnancy: Once a woman’s uterus becomes fully developed and she begins her menses, an egg is released from her ovary and she can become pregnant. With each ovulation, either the right or left ovary will release a fertile egg. This release generally alternates, with the right ovary releasing an egg one month and the left ovary the next.
    The physiological functions of a woman’s uterus are connected to the energetic functions of the Heart, Liver, Spleen, and Kidneys, as well as to the Conception and Thrusting Vessels (Figure 3). The uterus connects to the Kidneys (which provide the uterus with Jing), the Conception Vessel (which provides the uterus with Qi and nourishes the fetus), and the Thrusting Channel (which provides the uterus with Blood). When the Jing of the Kidneys becomes sufficient, the menstrual period occurs regularly, the woman can become pregnant, and her womb is capable of nourishing a fetus. The Qi and Blood of the Twelve Primary Channels pass into the uterus through the Thrusting and Conception Vessels, affecting the quality and regularity of menstrual cycle.
The Internal Organ Connections of the Uterus

Figure 3. The Internal Organ Connections of the Uterus

 

The Uterus as the Heart of the Lower Dantian

It is important to realize that every individual was conceived and developed in the center of the uterus, which is considered the heart of a woman’s Lower Dantian. Therefore, when an individual meditates and enters the Wuji (considered the womb of the universe), it is a symbolic re-creation of the process of his or her original physical and energetic formation.

From a Medical Qigong perspective (and in Daoist Internal Alchemy), the Earth energy is gathered in the uterus and Lower Dantian area. The uterus is associated with the development and formation of the fetus’ tissues, thereby allowing the Eternal Soul the ability to acquire familiarity with lower vibrational resonances in order to experience life on the material plane. The uterus is, in a very real sense, a temple for the entrance of the human soul into embodied life on this plane. The quiescent state in which the fetus developed is attainable after birth through prayer, meditation, and sleep. These three states form the foundation for the creation and tonification of Prenatal Jing, Qi, and Shen.

Given its Yin nature and close proximity to the Earth, the Lower Dantian itself is considered a kinesthetic or physical center of consciousness. Inside the Lower Dantian, the uterus interacts with the energetic fields of the first three lower chakra gates. Together, the three gates of the Lower Dantian (CV-8, GV-1, GV-4) form a downward pointing triangle energetically structured to absorb and store Earth Qi into the uterine area.

The uterus and Lower Dantian area is the major storage area for the various types of Kidney energies (i.e., Qi of the ovaries), and it is often called the Sea of Qi. It is the place where Qi is housed, the body’s Mingmen Fire is aroused, the Kidney Yin and Yang Qi is gathered, and the Yuan Qi is stored. As mentioned earlier, Yuan Qi is also known as Source Qi and is the foundation of all the other types of Qi in the body. The Yuan Qi is closely linked with the Prenatal Essence (Yuan Jing). Together, the Yuan Qi and Yuan Jing determine the individual’s overall health, vitality, stamina, and life span.

 

Western Medical Perspective 

The major portion of the uterus is commonly referred to as the body; the superior rounded region of the uterus (above the entrance of the fallopian tubes) is called the Fundus; the slightly narrowed region towards the base of the body is called the Isthmus; and the narrow neck or outlet into the vagina is called the Cervix (Figure 4).

Figure 4

The wall of the uterus is composed of three layers: the Perimetrium, Myometrium and Endometrium, described as follows:

  • The Perimetrium: The outermost serous layer of the uterus is known as the visceral peritoneum.
  • The Myometrium: The thick, middle layer of the uterus is known as the myometrium, and is composed of interlacing bundles of smooth muscles. The myometrium is responsible for the rhythmic contractions initiated during childbirth, needed to release the baby from out of the mother.
  • The Endometrium: The innermost layer of the uterus is known as the endometrium, and it is the mucosal lining of the uterine cavity, composed of a simple columnar epithelium underlain by a thick lamina propria of highly cellular connective tissue. The endometrium has two primary strata (layers): the Functional Layer (Stratum Functionalis), which undergoes cyclic changes in response to blood levels of ovarian hormones and is discharged during menstruation; and the Basal Layer, which is responsible for forming a new Stratum Functionalis after the menstruation ends.

 

Uterine Tumors 

A uterine tumor, or myoma, is the most frequent type of tumor found within the female pelvic area. In diagnosis, multiple uterine myomas are generally discovered, as opposed to finding just one.

The myoma is commonly called a “fibroid,” although it contains muscle tissue. Originating from the interstitial substance of the uterine wall (in the myometrium), fibroids have a solid, rubbery consistency. Although considered a benign growth, excessive uterine bleeding is a common effect of uterine fibroids.

Uterine tumors are described by their shape and size and are generally divided into three types of myomas: the subserous type, the intramural or interstitial type, and the submucous type, described as follows:

  • The Subserous Type: This type of tumor is located on the outside wall of the uterus
  • The Intramural or Interstitial Type: This type of tumor is located within the wall of the uterus
  • The Submucous Type: This type of tumor is located on the inside of the uterus

Fibroids can also grow laterally into the broad ligament of the uterus (intraligamentary fibroid) distorting the physical structure of the ureters and uterine vessels or impinging on the intramural portion of the patient’s fallopian tube (Figure 5).

Figure 5. Uterine tumors are generally divided into three types of myoma: the subserous type is located on the outside wall of the Uterus; the intramural or interstitial type is located within the wall of the Uterus; and the submucous type is located on the inside of the Uterus (Inspired by the original artwork of Dr. Frank H. Netter).

Figure 5. Uterine tumors are generally divided into three types of myoma: the subserous type is located on the outside wall of the Uterus; the intramural or interstitial type is located within the wall of the Uterus; and the submucous type is located on the inside of the Uterus (Inspired by the original artwork of Dr. Frank H. Netter).

Uterine fibroids vary in size, shape and position. Large tumors may sometimes absorb the patient’s Qi and Blood supply. The resulting type of Qi and Blood Stagnation can create a simultaneous deficient and excess condition (Figure 6). Occasionally, a myoma extending from a long pedicle can gradually protrude from the external opening at the mouth of the uterus causing a prolapse that can, in turn, create a complete inversion of the uterus (Figure 7). Sometimes a submucous fibroid will extend downward from the posterior aspect of the uterine wall and become incarcerated in the cavity of the sacrum (Figure 8). Also, calcification in a submucous fibroid can sometimes occur within the uterus (Figure 9).

Figure 6789

At times, the stagnation created within a large fibroid may outgrow its Qi and Blood supply resulting in a condition known as cystic degeneration (Figure 10). This soft, tender tissue mass can sometimes be confusing when trying to distinguish its structure from the energetic sensations of a solid myoma.

Figure 10

Figure 10. Stagnant Qi and Blood supply can sometimes result in a condition known as cystic degeneration (Inspired by the original artwork of Dr. Frank H. Netter).

 

Etiology of Uterine Tumors

The primary causes of uterine myomas are believed to be hormone related, influenced by a high estrogen progesterone profile and testosterone-insulin-estrogen imbalance. In the 1990s, in the Medical Qigong Clinics in China, it was also believed that the emotional components of uterine tumors result from the suppression of anger, rage, and fear, causing Qi and Blood to stagnate within the uterus.

 

Classifications of Uterine Myomas and their Symptoms

Uterine myomas can be diagnosed according to the following five main categories and their symptoms.

  1. Liver Qi Stagnation: Symptoms of Liver Qi Stagnation include mood swings, anger, frustration, depression, breast tenderness, breast lumps, irregular or short menstrual cycles, clots in the menstrual Blood, PMS, and cold extremities.
  2. Kidney and Liver Yin Deficiency: Symptoms of Kidney and Liver Yin Deficiency include night sweats, palpitations, hot flashes, thirst, low back pain, dry eyes, chronic vaginal infections, cystitis, and weak knees.
  3. Kidney Yang Deficiency: Symptoms of Kidney Yang Deficiency include fatigue, weak knees, cold hands and feet, low back pain, and nocturnal urination.
  4. Qi and Blood Deficiency: Symptoms of Qi and Blood Deficiency include insomnia, fatigue, poor memory, poor vision, dizziness, digestive problems, weak muscles, dry skin, and a very light or a very heavy menses.
  5. Heart Fire: Symptoms of Heart Fire include hot flashes, palpitations, anxiety, fear, insomnia, irregular menses, red tipped tongue, forgetfulness, and nightmares.

 

Treatment Protocol for Benign Uterine Tumors

To treat uterine fibroids, the doctor uses Medical Qigong therapy in conjunction with Jing point therapy and herbs.

  1. After completing the “1 through 10 Meditation” and “3 Invocations,” prep the patient by initiating the general Medical Qigong Treatment Protocol (see Volume 3, Chapter 28). Focus specific attention on Purging the diseased area of pathogenic Qi, using the Thunder Palm technique in conjunction with the Vibrating Palm to disperse the stagnation from the uterus.
  2. Disperse pathogenic Qi out the patient’s body via the Liver and Gall Bladder Channels.
  3. Project the descending “Yu” sound into the tissue area.
  4. Open and cleanse the patient’s Second Chakra Gate, then energize the area while emitting orange colored Qi.
  5. Insert a Cord of Light from the divine deep into the energetic cluster. Hold the intention for the cancer to dissolve until you feel an energetic shift.
  6. Once you feel there has been an energetic transformation, fill the patient’s entire uterus with white light energy and allow it to overflow into the lower torso.
  7. Tonify the patient’s Lower Dantian with Qi and circulate the energy through the Microcosmic Orbit.

 

Figure 11Homework Prescriptions #1

The patient should be given homework, in accordance with her constitution. The prescriptions should include:

  1. Healing Sound “Guo”: The patient should practice the descending “Guo” sound to disperse Liver Fire (Figure 11).
  2. Healing Sound “Yu”: The patient should practice the descending “Yu” sound to disperse the uterine stagnation (Figure 12).
  3. Lower Dantian Regulation: Have the patient perform the Lower Dantian regulation exercises to access and regulate the ovarian energy.
  4. Slow Walking Therapy: The patient should practice Slow Walking Therapy 20 minutes a day to Tonify the Qi.
  5. Jing Point Therapy: Have the patient press and stimulate the Sp-6, Sp-9, St-36, GB-34, and GB-38 points (Figure 13). Press both sides of the legs and stimulate the points using the Grasping and Shaking massage technique. Gently pull on the lower legs while emitting Qi up the Yin channels into the uterus, then push down the Yang channels into the feet, for 18 breaths.

Figure 131415



Homework Prescriptions #2

Each week perform the following Medical Qigong prescription exercises, practicing them a minimum of once a day. After a week of “Beating the Bag” change the prescription to the “Dry Crying” exercise.

  1. Beating the Bag: Have the patient practice Lower Dantian purging exercises such as “Beating the Bag” to release suppressed anger and rage (Figure 14).
  2. Dry Crying: Have the patient practice the Lung purging exercises such as “Dry Crying” to release suppressed grief (Figure 15).

 

Homework Prescriptions #3

  1. Energetic Point Therapy: Have the patient practice Energetic Point Therapy for treating benign uterine tumors. Begin by shaking and pointing the middle finger of her right hand (using the Soaring Dragon Hand Posture) at the location of the uterine tumor (close to the body); while her left hand faces the Lower Dantian (farther away from the body). 

Visualize divine healing light from the middle finger dissolving the tumor (like a laser beam). The patient should repeat the sounds “Jiu-Jiu, Jiu-Jiu” (Figure 16).

The success of this exercise depends on imagining that divine healing light is purifying and transforming the disease. The image of divine light purifies the Toxic Qi, allowing the clean Qi to become transformed and transported to the Lower Dantian. This allows the patient’s Righteous Qi and Yuan Qi to become stronger, which supports the body’s immune system.

Homework Prescriptions #4

  1. Figure 1617Dispelling the Filth Meditation: The patient should be given the “Dispelling the Filth Meditation” prescription, practiced as follows (Figure 17):
    From a sitting posture, with the eyes closed, and the body relaxed, place the tongue up against the upper hard palate, behind the teeth.
    Breathe naturally and evenly.
    Inhale, and imagine Divine Qi entering through the nose, descending the center torso, and whirling into the upper area of the uterus. Imagine and feel the Qi circulating clockwise on a horizontal plane, building momentum as the energy flows down to the fibroid area.
    Once the energy has reached the fibroid area, imagine the whirling Qi absorbing the noxious Heat and turbid Qi from the uterine area, transforming it into wind, which is dispelled out through the vagina. The exercise is repeated 10 times.
    • Perform the “Pulling Down the Heavens” exercise in order to further cleans and purify the tissues.
    Next, gently close the anal sphincter. While inhaling, imagine energetically “sipping” clean Earth Qi through the vagina into the cervix, uterus, and Lower Dantian area. Imagine and feel it transforming into wind. This wind circulates in a counterclockwise direction on a horizontal plane, spiraling up the body, through the Thrusting Vessel and exits the body through the mouth with each exhalation. Repeat this visualization 10 times.
    Focus the attention on the Lower Dantian; imagine the vital Qi returning back to its origin, while rubbing the abdomen in a clockwise direction on a vertical plane, ending the prescription.

 

Herbs for Treating Uterine Tumors 

The following is a list of herbs (Chinese and internationally known) that are traditionally used in the treatment of Uterine Tumors. It is important to consult a licensed acupuncturist, naturopath, or herbalist before taking these herbs. Each individual will require treatments personally based on the diagnosis of her specific constitution and symptoms.

  •  Astragalus, Astragali membramaceus (Huang Qi)
  • Garlic, Allium sativum, (Da Suan)
  • Green Tea, Camillia sinensis
  • Thuja, Thuja occidentalis
  • Poke, Phytolacca americana
  • Tumeric, Curcuma longa (Yu Jin)

 

Uterine Cancer

lasm of the uterus. There is progression in energetic pathology wherein the formation of a tumor, if left untreated, can transform into a malignant mass or cancer.

 

Figure 18. Uterine Cancer Etiological Factors

Figure 18. Uterine Cancer Etiological Factors

Etiology of Uterine Cancer 

The etiology of uterine cancer is unknown. Possible causes of the disease may be explained as follows (Figure 18):

  • Chronic stress and the suppression of emotions
  • Toxins: Retention of Blood after menstrual period, or postpartum causing Damp Heat formation
  • Unhygienic sexual activity
  • Pathological changes of the endometrial hyperplasia
  • Cervical carcinoma spreading into the uterus
  • Hormonal imbalances

 

Symptoms

Endometrial cancer is one of the most common forms of uterine cancer and is often associated with excessively high amounts of estrogen. Symptoms include: metrorrhagia, dysmenorrhea, vaginal itching or burning, and leukorrhea.

A uterine carcinoma is generally more common in women after menopause: roughly 75% of uterine cancers occur in postmenopausal women, 15% in peri-menopausal women, and 10% in menstruating women. The main clinical manifestations include pain in the lower abdomen, waist, and thighs; postcoital bleeding; profuse leukorrhea (abnormal uterine bleeding with a bloody, purulent discharge); or sanguinous leukorrhea.

In the late stages, the patient may experience drastic hypogastralgia, fever, anorexia or urodynia, hematuria, constipation or diarrhea. In the final stages, the patient may also experience hemorrhage, infection, cachexia, uremia, and death.

 

Carcinoma of the Uterus

A carcinoma of the uterus can progress in stages. The early stages of a carcinoma involving the inferior aspect of the fundus of the uterus (for example), may only involve the endometrial layers of tissue (Figure 19). As the disease becomes more extensive, it begins to extend deeper into the uterine muscles (Figure 20). As the disease continues to progress the extensive carcinoma can invade the entire myometrium and can extend into the patient’s ovary (Figure 21). The cancer, if left untreated, can eventually penetrate the patient’s uterine wall and can metastasize into the peritoneum, intestines, omentum and Urinary Bladder (Figure 22).

Figure 1922

 

Sarcoma of the Uterus

A sarcoma of the uterus is generally rare: less then 3% of all female genital tract malignancies are of this nature (Figure 23). A sarcoma of the uterus is most likely to appear at the center of a large tumor due to inadequate Blood supply (Figure 24). Occasionally, a uterine polyp can manifest as a sarcomatous degeneration (Figure 25). Even more rare is a condition known as Sarcoma Botryoides (also called “grape” sarcoma), involving the multiple berry-like Sarcoma formations that vary in size ranging from that of a pea to the size of grapes. This type of sarcoma only occurs in young children (Figure 26).

Figure 2327

A sarcoma can originate in any part to the uterus that contains mesodermal tissue. Despite its location or histological classification, the size and extent of the tumor are the most important concern.

 

Treatment Protocol for Uterine Cancer: In Situ

One Medical Qigong therapeutic technique used in China to treat uterine cancer is as follows:

  1. After completing the “1 through 10 Meditation” and “3 Invocations,” prep the patient by initiating the general Medical Qigong Treatment Protocol (see Chapter 28 of Chinese Medical Qigong Therapy: Volume 3). Focus specific attention on Purging the Excess Heat from Liver and pathogenic Qi from the uterus out the patient’s body via the Liver and Gall Bladder Channels.
  2. Purge the Liver area using the “Guo” sound, to remove Liver Qi Stagnation and Blood Stasis. Direct the “Guo” sound to flow from the Liver into the uterus. From the uterus direct the toxic Qi to flow down the patient’s legs and out her body.
  3. With the patient supine, begin to purge the diseased uterine area of pathogenic Qi, using the Thunder Palm technique in conjunction with the Vibrating Palm to disperse the stagnation. Send the vibration out the uterus, down the legs and out of the patient’s body.
  4. Stand at the patient’s feet or lower abdomen and project the “Yu” sound, emitting the Qi into the uterus to disperse the Heat from the cancer cells directing the toxic Qi to flow down the Liver channels out the legs.
  5. After purging the tissue area, dislodge and purge the patient’s front Second Chakra Gate Filter. Reset the front Second Chakra Gate and energize the patient’s Taiji Pole.
  6. Connect and root the patient’s Second Chakra Gate and Taiji Pole to the energetic flow stemming from the patient’s Upper, Middle, and Lower Dantians
  7. Alternate the following treatment protocols: 
    • For the First Treatment: Connect to the divine and create an Energy Ball in your right palm. The Energy Ball should swirl in a counterclockwise direction creating the effect of an energy-absorbing tornado. Insert the swirling Energy Ball into the patient’s uterus and direct its movements with your intent. The Energy Ball should be guided to swish back and forth inside the patient’s uterine area in order to dissolve the tumor’s energetic matrix. After several minutes remove the Energy Ball and discard it into the energetic vortex underneath the treatment table. 
    • For the Second Treatment: Connect with the Divine and insert a Column of Divine Healing light into the uterine area in order to further dissolve the tumor’s energetic matrix. Insert a Cord of Light from the Divine deep into the energetic cluster and hold the intention until you feel an energetic shift. Once you feel there has been an energetic transformation, fill the patient’s entire uterus with white light energy and allow it to overflow into the lower torso.
  8. After several minutes, energetically compress the tumor area, dissolving the cancer’s energetic matrix and purging any Turbid Qi from the patient’s uterus.
  9. Fill and tonify the patient’s Lower Dantian and Kidneys with Qi. Circulate the energy through the Microcosmic Orbit to improve Qi and Blood circulation through the Governing and Conception Vessels.

 

Homework Prescriptions #1

The Conception Vessel moves Qi in the Lower Burner and uterus; it is the primary vessel used in treating uterine and cervical cancer. Sexual activities are therefore prohibited from the start of the treatments until treatment is no longer needed.

  1. Healing Sound “Guo”: The patient should practice the descending “Guo” sound to disperse Liver Fire (Figure 11).
  2. Healing Sound “Yu”: The patient should practice the Descending the Yang and Ascending the Yin Technique, ending with the healing sound “Yu” for 18 breaths. This is followed immediately by the descending “Yu” sound for 18 breaths. Have the patient repeat this sequence 9 times a day (Figure 12).
  3. Slow Walking Therapy: Prescribe the Cancer Walking methods used for treating Kidney disease. The Slow Walking Method should be practiced by patients for 20 minutes a day.
  4. Taking in the Dark Midnight Blue Qi: Have the patient practice the method of “Taking in the Dark Midnight Blue Qi,” three times a day for 15 minutes each session, to strengthen the Kidneys.
  5. Jing Point Therapy: Have the patient press and stimulate the Sp-6, Sp-9, St-36, GB-34, and GB-38 points (Figure 13). Press both sides of the legs and stimulate the points using the Grasping and Shaking massage technique. Gently pull on the lower legs while emitting Qi up the Yin channels into the uterus, then down the Yang channels into the feet, for 18 breaths.

 

Homework Prescriptions #2

  1. Dispelling the Filth Meditation: Have the patient practice the “Dispelling the Filth” meditation, while focusing on the uterus. This meditation is practiced as follows (Figure 17):
  • From a sitting posture, with the eyes closed, and the body relaxed, place the tongue up against the upper hard palate, behind the teeth. 
  • Breathe naturally and evenly. Inhale, and imagine Divine Qi entering through the nose, descending the center torso, and whirling into the upper area of the uterus. Imagine and feel the Qi circulating clockwise on a horizontal plane, building momentum as the energy flows down into the upper portion of the uterus.
  • Imagine Qi whirling in through the upper portion of the uterus, circulating clockwise on a horizontal plane, building momentum as the energy flows downward to the base of the uterus.
  • Once the energy has reached just above the cervix area, imagine the whirling Qi absorbing the noxious Heat and Toxic Qi from the uterus, transforming it into wind, and dispelling it out the vagina. Repeat this sequence 10 times.
  • Perform the “Pulling Down the Heavens” exercise in order to further cleans and purify the tissues.
  • Next, gently close the anal sphincter. While inhaling, imagine energetically “sipping” clean Earth Qi through the vagina into the cervix, uterus, and Lower Dantian area. Imagine and feel it transforming into wind. This wind circulates in a counterclockwise direction on a horizontal plane, spiraling up the body, through the Thrusting Vessel and exits the body through the mouth with each exhalation. Repeat this visualization 10 times.
  • Focus the attention on the Lower Dantian, imagine the Qi returning to its origin, and rub the abdomen 36 times in a clockwise direction to end the prescription.

 

Homework Prescriptions #3

Each week perform the following Medical Qigong prescription exercises, practicing them a minimum of once a day. After a week of “Beating the Bag” change the prescription to the “Dry Crying” exercise.

  1. Beating the Bag: Have the patient practice Lower Dantian purging exercises such as “Beating the Bag” to release suppressed anger and rage (Figure 14).
  2. Dry Crying: Have the patient practice the Lung purging exercises such as “Dry Crying” to release suppressed grief (Figure 15).

 

Herbs for Treating Uterine Cancer 

The following is a list of herbs (Chinese and internationally known) that are traditionally used in the treatment of Uterine Cancer. It is important to consult a licensed acupuncturist, naturopath, or herbalist before taking these herbs. Each individual will require treatments personally based on the diagnosis of her specific constitution and symptoms.

  • Astragalus, Astragali membramaceus (Huang Qi)
  • Garlic, Allium sativum, (Da Suan)
  • Green Tea, Camillia sinensis
  • Thuja, Thuja occidentalis
  • Poke, Phytolacca americana
  • Tumeric, Curcuma longa (Yu Jin)